July 22, 2014



 

Search Results for: convention center arch plan

Recycled Furniture Eco-Friendly for Home

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-Bio-Digester-Kitchen-Island

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-Bio-Digester-Kitchen-Island

 

 

It was no secret that each house would have problem with sewage, especially kitchen sewage. More and more sewage is wasted and more environmental pollution occurs. Now, Philips Design Probes present Microbal Home. An innovative solution adapted from ecological cycles that occur in nature, they apply to furniture of this technology. A design that challenge conventional design to save energy. A closed ecosystem cycle, the device acts as biological machine to filter, process and recycle sewage. At front, there is a bio-digester kitchen islands, which form methane digester, which converts organic waste the rest of the vegetables into methane gases that can be used as lighting. On the desk is ceramic garden and vegetable storage areas and food planted in the table. Plastic waste is problem in every household, but with Paternoster waste up-cycler, the matter is resolved to take advantage of powerful enzymes. Then broken glass vessels arranged into honeycomb shape. Processing waste using bacteria, to solve our sewage problems. Starting from simple idea that’s applied to innovative action for the future.

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-Vegetable-storage

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-Vegetable-storage

 

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-Unique-Shape

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-Unique-Shape

 

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-Paternoster-Waste-Up-Cycler

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-Paternoster-Waste-Up-Cycler

 

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-Methane-gases

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-Methane-gases

 

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-kitchen-sewage

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-kitchen-sewage

 

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-honeycomb

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-honeycomb

 

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-food-planted

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-food-planted

 

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-ceramic-garden

Recycled-Furniture-Eco-Friendly-ceramic-garden

 

 

New SFO International Airport Terminal 2 will be Completed April

sfo-international-airport-terminal-2

sfo-international-airport-terminal-2

San Francisco’s International Airport Terminal 2 super green renovation and expansion is a groundbreaking example of how sustainable building strategies can help ease travelers stress while showing off the culture and lifestyle of the Bay Area. This project planned to be completed in April 2011, will go beyond efficiency upgrades for the airlines.

Gensler is leading the redesign with the help of Turner Construction, who are incorporating local and organic restaurants, a natural displacement ventilation system, zero waste strategies and systems, and much more with the ultimate goal of LEED Gold certification. Traveling through SFO could soon be a dream rather than a chore.

New restaurants will feature local and organic food, showing off the best of Bay Area cuisine, artisans, food producers and more. New lounge like waiting areas offer a variety of seating, plus plug in charging stations, elevated work counters, and free wireless internet. An interactive and educational childrens’ play area will keep the little ones entertained, providing a more enjoyable experience for parents, children and travelers.

Sustainability wise, green building strategies are incorporated throughout the entire renovation to save energy, reduce waste, and provide a healthier and less stressful traveling experience. An innovative displacement ventilation system will deliver superior air quality throughout the terminal while using 20% less energy than conventional systems. The $383 million renovation is expected to be completed this coming April.

sfo-international-airport-south-ticketing-hall

sfo-international-airport-south-ticketing-hall

sfo-international-airport-retail-concourse

sfo-international-airport-retail-concourse

sfo-international-airport-north-ticketing-hall

sfo-international-airport-north-ticketing-hall

sfo-international-airport-departures-lounge

sfo-international-airport-departures-lounge

sfo-international-airport-departures-curb

sfo-international-airport-departures-curb

source: inhabitat, gensler, turnerconstruction

Striking Helix Bridge Design in Singapore’s Marina Bay

helix-bridge-platform-view

helix-bridge-platform-view

Designed by Cox Rayner Architects, the Helix Bridge is one of the few, if any, bridges in the world to be named after its structure. This bridge was designed to respond to its particular setting at the opening of the Singapore River to Marina Bay, a large inner harbour on which much of the city is now focussed.

The concept derived initially from the desire to curve the plan of the bridge so that it sweeps down onto promenades either side. This ‘arc’ was also means of curving the pedestrian bridge away from an adjoining new vehicular bridge. The Helix Bridge are canopied for shade and shelter in the tropical climate. With a double spiral structure, it would utilise up to five times less steel than a conventional box girder bridge, and equally became excited about the prospect of such a structure making an iconic statement for Singapore.

helix-bridge-night-view

helix-bridge-night-view

helix-bridge-for-public-pedestrian

helix-bridge-for-public-pedestrian

source: evolo, coxarchitecture

Modern ISTBIII Building by Jones Studio

istbiii-building-seperate-wall

istbiii-building-seperate-wall

Designed by Jones Studio, the ISTBIII (Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building III) are consist of Applied Biological Sciences and AZ Bio Institute, Applied Cognitive Sciences Center, and the Healthy Lifestyles Center. Shared break room and other common building functions provide opportunities for informal gatherings amongst the different researchers in the building. This project received the USGBC LEED Gold certification.

ISTBIII strives to provide an atmosphere that both inspires and facilitates a healthy working and learning environment. Utilizing unconventional laboratory planning and organizational strategies, the building promotes intellectual interaction between its occupants along with a reconnection with the natural environment. With four separate, yet similar research departments occupying the building, the programmatic layout and circulation system encourage cross-disciplinary interaction with potentially tangential research possibilities.

ISTBIII is the first non academic research building to be built at Arizona State University Polytechnic campus. This is an important building block as the Polytechnic campus continues to develop into a genuine university community for the East Valley. With tremendous growth transforming the Valley over the past decade and significant development yet to come, it is everyone’s responsibility to try and provide a product that can respect the finite amount of resources available to use, and also consume as little energy as possible over its lifespan.

istbiii-building-research-lab

istbiii-building-research-lab

istbiii-building-plantation-area

istbiii-building-plantation-area

istbiii-building-north-and-east-elevation

istbiii-building-north-and-east-elevation

istbiii-building-ground-plan

istbiii-building-ground-plan

istbiii-building-front-door

istbiii-building-front-door

istbiii-building-cafe-view

istbiii-building-cafe-view

source: archdaily, jonesstudioinc

Re-Envision Eco Hotel from 49ers Stadium in San Fransisco

eco-hotel-comparison-scale

eco-hotel-comparison-scale

The re envision Candlestick Park is actually the starting point for Todd Jersey architecture to turn the stadium into a multipurpose venue that includes an eco-hotel and convention center that could not only save the surrounding swampland but green the scene as well.

Ahotel would be built up around the existing stadium, and guests could watch 49ers games right from the suites within. The convention center would occupy the field level when games are not in progress. All functions of the structure could make do with the parking already allocated to the stadium, and the surrounding wetlands would be preserved.

eco-hotel-wetland-view

eco-hotel-wetland-view

eco-hotel-interior-view

eco-hotel-interior-view

eco-hotel-from-candlestick-stadium

eco-hotel-from-candlestick-stadium

eco-hotel-candlestick-green-view

eco-hotel-candlestick-green-view

eco-hotel-before-and-after-design

eco-hotel-before-and-after-design

source: inhabitat, toddjerseyarchitecture

New Urbanism Soup City for Tokyo

soup-city-structure-design

soup-city-structure-design

The multi layered and self organized urban centers of Tokyo, Odaiba was master planned to accommodate an array of skyscrapers connected by a transportation network and green space. Although the site offers vast territories unprecedented in Tokyo, development by the private sector has been slow primarily due to its significant scale.

soup-city-map-location

soup-city-map-location

The lack of human scale places significant risk upon investors and discourages small businesses to move in, resulting in less programmatic diversity and an ineptitude in being able to adapt to the needs of an ever changing society.

soup-city-building-facility

soup-city-building-facility

In order to create a viable environment for a wide array of businesses to coexist and flourish, Soup City draws inspiration from the field like urbanism of Tokyo as a model for successful development. The active ribbon contains a series of service and entertainment programs such as retail, theaters, hotels, etc, which serve to attract various visitors into the complex.

The open ribbon is resizable rentable floor space, capable of accommodating small to large offices and private apartment blocks. Lastly, the transportation ribbon provides a means for servicing goods and moving visitors to and from specific locations within the complex.

soup-city-aerial-view

soup-city-aerial-view

It also provides parking spaces along its length. Unlike the stacked floor configuration of a conventional skyscraper, the linear organization of each ribbon allows for various components to grow or shrink without compromising the original structure.

soup-city-activity-area

soup-city-activity-area

source: evolo

Futuristic Datong Sports Park in China

datong-sports-park-undulating-design

datong-sports-park-undulating-design

Designed by architecture studio Populous, The sports park in the historic city of Datong will have a 30,000 seat stadium, an 8,000 seat arena, a 1500 seat natatorium and a multiuse training hall, is part of a larger plan by the Datong Mayor to regenerate the historic old city and create a new city centre with other development including a city hall, museum, convention centre.

datong-sports-park-soccer-stadium

datong-sports-park-soccer-stadium

Inspiration for the new Datong Sports Park has come from both its impressive cultural heritage and the stunning rugged beauty of the surrounding landscape outside the city.

datong-sports-park-night-view

datong-sports-park-night-view

The rich valleys, escarpments and weathered mountain faces surrounding the Loess Plateau outside Datong City rival the brutally etched Judean desert as it stretches towards the Dead Sea.

The colour and texture of the mountain ranges are comparable to the landscape of the Grand Canyon in America.

datong-sports-park-indoor-arena

datong-sports-park-indoor-arena

The Sports Park in Datong will provide work for 10 professional staff in Populous’ Brisbane office. The firm’s senior principal Paul Henry said the win reflected Populous’s future strategy in Asia.

datong-sports-park-complex-view

datong-sports-park-complex-view

The Datong Sports Park also provided the opportunity to celebrate a number of strong, unique features in the city’s history and cultural character combined with the more humanistic ideals and ambitions embodied in the design of modern sports parks.

datong-sports-park-aerial-view

datong-sports-park-aerial-view

source: evolo, populous, archicentral

Modern Vanke Center Prototypes by Steven Holl

vanke-center-prototypes-pond-place

vanke-center-prototypes-pond-place

A vast program is packed onto the Vanke Center’s reclaimed lake front site through two basic gestures. First, most of the compartmentalized programs, including apartments, hotel and the head offices of Vanke, are grouped together in a linear bar building, almost as long as New York’s Empire State building is tall.

vanke-center-prototypes-path-diagram

vanke-center-prototypes-path-diagram

Rather than collect the program in a series of individual object buildings each dedicated to a unique function, the elements are assembled into a singular, space-defining, elevated mega-structure.

vanke-center-prototypes-open-air-space

vanke-center-prototypes-open-air-space

Steven Holl’s nearly completed Vanke Center, in Shenzen, China is also lifted up off of its site, but unlike its modern progenitors this lift allows the project to marry the two halves of what had previously been a dichotomy of purpose.

The lift constructs a more active relationship to site, while reinvigorating the bar building as an archetypal residential typology. The project points to a future paradigm where internally derived, conceptually pure prototypes are subtly coopted to create new forms of contextuality.

vanke-center-prototypes-master-plan

vanke-center-prototypes-master-plan

The building’s environmental responsiveness points towards a new approach to site that is broader than a conventional notion of contextualism predicated on similar form, alignments, materiality and details. The Vanke Center suggests a strategy in which idealized formal prototypes be they existing infrastructural elements, peripheral buildings, broader site factors such as views and circulation, and environmental conditions such as air circulation and water control.

vanke-center-prototypes-landscape-design

vanke-center-prototypes-landscape-design

Derived from autonomous formal prototypes, these contemporary architectures, through their adaptability, can allow a new contextuality to emerge.

vanke-center-prototypes-building-view

vanke-center-prototypes-building-view

source: evolo, stevenholl

Paperless Library at Loyola University Campus

loyola-university-library-section

loyola-university-library-section

Designed by Richard J Klarchek, the Loyola University campus in Chicago has fantastic lakeshore views and an abundance of natural light. This unconventional library is completely free of books, instead its digital reading rooms connect students with information while they relax in arm chairs facing the waterfront tides.

loyola-university-library-lakeshore-view

loyola-university-library-lakeshore-view

Resembling a glass box posed between limestone bookends, the design was able to triumph over glare and ventilation issues. Using an innovative three-tiered method for heating and cooling, the finished building consumes half the energy of those that meet standard building codes.

loyola-university-library-glass-wall

loyola-university-library-glass-wall

Integrated radiant slabs and an under-floor air system allow the natural lake breeze to move through automated openings in the glass wall windows, venting up and out through the west side cavity. To regulate the system’s temperature and humidity, a more conventional method of HVAC can kick in when needed. During the winter months, tubes beneath a raised floor combine with a radiant ceiling system to heat the building.

In order to achieve LEED Silver certification, the designers employed many additional sustainable strategies. A high percentage of recycled content was used in the project’s construction, Low VOC materials and finishes were specified, and water saving plumbing fixtures were installed.

loyola-university-library-front-view

loyola-university-library-front-view

Surrounding the building is an integrated high-efficiency irrigation system, and a green roof helps to manage stormwater while creating a beautiful view from the fourth floor. The building is the first in a series of sustainable projects envisioned by Loyola. They also plan on updating and repurposing space in two other libraries on campus which currently cater to graduate students and faculty.

loyola-university-library-1st-floor-plan

loyola-university-library-1st-floor-plan

source: inhabitat, luc

House of the Future at Sydney Opera House Exhibition

House-of-the-Future-Translucent-Solar-Panel

House-of-the-Future-Translucent-Solar-Panel

The House of the Future is a conceptual project designed by the Australian Architects Innovarchi for an exhibition on the grounds of the Sydney Opera House. The prefab home blends the outdoors with the indoors, concept with practicality, and materials with expression in order to explore what shelter can do.

House-of-the-Future-Prefab-Design

House-of-the-Future-Prefab-Design

The home’s concept is planted in green materials using wood sourced from a sustainable pine plantation, where the pine is able to provide a shell that can collect both rain and sun to naturally cool and heat the home.

House-of-the-Future-Plantation

House-of-the-Future-Plantation

The ultimate goal of the design is to blur the lines between the indoors and outdoors, provoking occupants to reassess the idea of a traditional home environment.

The home’s unique shape turns the outdoors into the core of the program, collecting natural resources and feeding them into the home when needed and available.

House-of-the-Future-Large-Window

House-of-the-Future-Large-Window

The rain catchment supplies the central garden, and in return the garden cools and regulates the interior temperature through central natural ventilation system.

House-of-the-Future-Interior-Design

House-of-the-Future-Interior-Design

A strip of semi-translucent solar panels cross the home, simultaneously providing daylight and power, and LED lights and furniture are also embedded in the design. The home’s appeal is its refreshing take on envelope – the walls and roof mingle with less definition through a play of angles and unconventional material finishes.

House-of-the-Future-Heat-Circulation

House-of-the-Future-Heat-Circulation

source : inhabitat, innovarchi, newdezain